© 2016 Horse Protection Society of BC

DONATING

Financial support is vital to our operation and we are grateful for every contribution. 

All donations go toward supporting the care of our horses and our programs. HPS is able to offer tax receipts for any donation of $20.00 or more.

Ways You Can Donate:

 -   Cash (Please do not mail cash)
-    Cheque or money order to the barn address
-    Online credit card through the PayPal 'Donate' button
-    Online one time or monthly contribution through Canada Helps

-    Online donations through Chimps

-    e-transfers to hps@telus.net
-    In-kind gifts of goods (see our wish list here)

Mail To: 

Horse Protection Society of BC
P.O. Box 10054 Otter Coop

Aldergrove, BC  V4W 3Z5

 

Make a Gift:

Your one time gift will help HPS care for our horses by enabling us to purchase items such as:

- One bale of local hay                     $     9
- One bag of feed                              $   20
Mineral/salt block                           $    15
- Ground Flax                                    $   30
- De-Wormer                                    $    15
- Hoof Care                                        $   35 ($280 annually)
- Dental Visit                                     $ 250 (minimum)
- Vaccines (annually)                       $ 200
- Rain Sheet                                      $ 100
- Winter Blanket                               $ 175
- Stall Blanket                                   $   75
- Sponsor a horse for a month       $ 500
- Sponsor a horse for a year           $6000

We also need:

- Fencing materials

- Plywood

- Roofing materials

- Nails

Monthly Giving


If you would like to become a monthly donor, consider sponsoring one of our horses and become a HPS Champion.

 

Full support of a horse: $500/month.

 

You can choose to sponsor for any amount, all donations are gratefully accepted and go to help the horses.

When you commit to support a horse you can

- Send post dated cheques

- Pay on our secure website throughPayPal

- Payments through Canada Helps or Chimps each month. You can set up automatic monthly or annual payments through Canada Helps

If you would like to be an HPS Champion, contact us:
Email: hps@telus.net

Phone: 604.539.8391

Legacy Giving

The Horse Protection Society relies entirely on the generosity of our supporters to fulfill our mission to support and promote the total well-being of horses. There are several ways to make a legacy gift including:

1. Create a Bequest in your Will

If you choose to name HPS as a beneficiary in your will, you will leave a legacy that lives on in the lives of countless horses.

We will work with you and your legal counsel to determine the most appropriate bequest you can make. Please contact us directly for assistance.


2. Name HPS as the Beneficiary of a Life Insurance Policy ( At this time we wish to bring to your attention the Legal Update below released by Vancouver law firm Norton Rose Fulbright regarding gifts of life insurance policies to charities in BC.
 
As the Legal Update advises, recent enforcement action by the BC Financial Services Authority (BCFSA, formerly FICOM) makes the acceptance of a donation of a life insurance policy by a BC charity from a BC resident an offense under the Insurance Act of BC.
 
The Legal Update recommends that charities in BC “remove information regarding donations of life insurance policies from their websites and suspend any discussions with potential donors of life insurance policies until more information is forthcoming.”)


3. Name HPS as the Beneficiary of a RRSP or RRIF

Many Canadians are shocked to learn that the assets held in a Registered Retirement Savings Plan (RRSP) or Registered Retirement Income Fund (RRIF) become fully taxable income to one’s estate in one’s year of death (unless a beneficiary designation allows the plan to be rolled over to a spouse or dependent child).

By making The Horse Protection Society of BC the named beneficiary of your RRSP or RRIF, the donation tax credit can dramatically reduce or even eliminate your tax liability.

When you name a charity as the direct beneficiary of a RRSP or RRIF, your estate is entitled to a donation receipt for the amount paid out on death. As this asset passes directly to the charity, probate taxes can be avoided and the risk of creditor claims can be minimized.

You can make the change of beneficiary by completing paperwork with your financial institution but it is always a good idea to include your intentions with such accounts in your will as well.


4. Other Ways to Give Using Your RRSP or RRIF

Many people have considered donating to charity but what has perhaps been overlooked, is a planning opportunity that has always been available should you wish to donate a portion of your RRSP or RRIF to charity. Note, this opportunity produces the best results if you’re not in the top tax bracket, which kicks in at income over $120,000 for 2007, as will be explained below.

Say you wish to donate $1,000 of stock from your RRSP to charity. You will face tax on the $1,000 withdrawn at your full marginal tax rate but you will also be entitled to a donation receipt equal to $1,000.

For someone in the top tax bracket, it’s a simple in and out - the tax on the RRSP withdrawal will be offset by the donation tax credit.

For everyone else, however, because you get a donation credit at the highest rate for any donations you make over $200 per year, the credit can exceed the tax on the RRSP withdrawal, allowing you to use the remaining donation credit to offset tax on your other income.

Let’s assume that Eli is retired and is living on income from his investments which totals about $25,000 a year, putting him in a 21% tax bracket in Ontario. Assuming he already made $200 of donations during the year and he makes a special donation of $1,000 from his RRSP, Eli would owe $210 of tax on the RRSP withdrawal but he would also receive a tax receipt for $1,000, which is worth just over 40% or $400 in tax savings.

In other words, by donating $1,000 of RRSPs to charity, he not only withdraws the funds ‘tax-free’ but also gets an additional $190 ($400 -$210) of tax credits, which can then be used to reduce taxes on his investment income.

by Jamie Golombeck, CIBC

*Always consult with your tax advisors for the most current figures and advice.

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